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All about coronary artery disease coronary artery disease symptoms risk factors for coronary artery disease diagnosis of coronary artery disease treatments for coronary artery disease coronary artery disease prevention

How is coronary artery disease prevented?

Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease in the Western world. Prevention centers on the modifiable risk factors: blood sugar, lipoprotein transport systems, obesity, homocysteine, hypertension, sedentary lifestyle, dietary choices, smoking, uric acid, omega 3 oils, and an increasingly growing and large number of other physiological

markers and homeostatic mechanisms currently under scientific investigation.

Individuals with coronary artery disease are advised to avoid fats that are readily oxidized (e.g., saturated fats and trans-fats), limit carbohydrates and processed sugars to reduce production of all and especially Low density lipoproteins while increasing High density lipoproteins, keeping blood pressure normal, exercise and stop smoking. These measures limit the progression of the disease and may also help reverse it in some people.

Risk factor management is carried out during cardiac rehabilitation, a 4-phase process beginning in hospital after MI, angioplasty or heart surgery and continuing for a minimum of three months. Exercise is a main component of cardaic rehabiltation along with diet, smoking cessation and blood pressure and cholesterol management.

Smoking: Quitting smoking is most important. People who quit smoking decrease their risk of developing coronary artery disease by half compared with those who continue to smoke. How long people smoked before quitting does not matter. Quitting also decreases the risk of death after coronary artery bypass surgery or after a heart attack.

Diet: Limiting the amount of fat to no more than 25 to 35% of daily calories is recommended to promote good health. However, some experts believe that fat must be limited to 10% of daily calories to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. A low-fat diet also helps lower high total and LDL (the bad) cholesterol levels, another risk factor for coronary artery disease.

More information on coronary artery disease

What is coronary artery disease? - Coronary artery disease is a heart disease condition that results when the coronary arteries are narrowed or occluded, caused by atherosclerotic deposits of fibrous and fatty tissue.
What're the symptoms of coronary artery disease? - In most patients, the most common symptom of coronary artery disease is the type of chest pain called angina, or angina pectoris.
What're the risk factors for coronary artery disease? - Risk factors of coronary artery disease include advancing age, male sex, and a family history of early coronary artery disease.
How is coronary artery disease diagnosed? - The diagnosis of coronary artery disease requires a careful history, physical examination, and an electrocardiogram (ECG).
What're the treatments for coronary artery disease? - Medical treatment for coronary artery disease generally includes medications, risk factor reduction, along with close follow-up with your health care team.
How is coronary artery disease prevented? - Prevention of coronary artery disease centers on the modifiable risk factors: blood sugar, lipoprotein transport systems, obesity, homocysteine, hypertension.
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All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005