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All about cardiomyopathy symptoms of cardiomyopathy diagnosis of cardiomyopathy dilated cardiomyopathy causes of dilated cardiomyopathy symptoms of dilated cardiomyopathy treatments for dilated cardiomyopathy hypertrophic cardiomyopathy causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy symptoms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy treatment for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia causes of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia treatment for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia restrictive cardiomyopathy diagnosis of restrictive cardiomyopathy treatment for restrictive cardiomyopathy treatment for cardiomyopathy

What causes dilated cardiomyopathy?

Most cases of dilated cardiomyopathy are called "idiopathic," which means that no exact cause can be found. Some doctors think that viral infections may be responsible. Because you may have had the viral infection months or even years before you show any sign of a weakened heart muscle, the exact cause of dilated cardiomyopathy is difficult to pinpoint. Up to 30% of cases of dilated cardiomyopathy can be linked to heavy drinking. After years of heavy drinking, the heart can be weakened by

alcohol's toxic effect on its muscle cells. Also, heavy drinkers tend to drink alcohol instead of eating food, which leads to poor nutrition. Other toxic substances, including some chemicals and pesticides, have also been shown to weaken the heart muscle. Also, drug abuse has been found to weaken the heart muscle. If your body does not get enough of the essential vitamins and minerals it needs, especially vitamin B-1, it can lead to dilated cardiomyopathy. This is more common in developing countries than in the United States and other developed nations. In a rare condition called myocarditis, the heart muscle becomes swollen or inflamed because of an infection by a virus, less often, by bacteria, or by another infective process.

In rare cases, a woman may develop heart muscle disease late in pregnancy or during the first few months after she has had her baby. This is called peripartum cardiomyopathy. With or without having had a viral or bacterial infection, her heart muscle may become inflamed. Researchers have not been able to find out why this happens. They do know that if the woman gets over the disease and becomes pregnant again, she is again at risk for developing the condition. Although scientists do not know if there is a gene that causes people to develop dilated cardiomyopathy, many think that genetics plays a role. They point to cases where members of the same family have the disease. Also, some genetic brain disorders, such as muscular dystrophy, are associated with heart muscle disease.

More information on cardiomyopathy

What is cardiomyopathy? - Cardiomyopathy is an alteration in the function of the heart muscle. Cardiomyopathy is the deterioration of the cardiac muscle of the heart wall.
What're the symptoms of cardiomyopathy? - The symptoms of cardiomyopathy include fatigue, shortness of breath, fainting, leg swelling, and an enlarged and tender liver.
How is cardiomyopathy diagnosed? - Cardiomyopathy can be diagnosed by characteristic physical findings, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, cardiac catheterization and radionuclide angiography.
What is dilated cardiomyopathy? - Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the commonest form of cardiomyopathy, and one of the leading indications for heart transplantation.
What causes dilated cardiomyopathy? - No exact cause can be found for cardiomyopathy. Up to 30% of cases of dilated cardiomyopathy can be linked to heavy drinking.
What're the symptoms of dilated cardiomyopathy? - Typical signs and symptoms of dilated cardiomyopathy include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and swelling of the legs and feet.
What're the treatments for dilated cardiomyopathy? - Treatment for dilated cardiomyopathy is focused on relieving the symptoms and the extra load on the heart. Lifestyle changes, medicines, and surgery may be needed.
What is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the second most common type of cardiomyopathy and results in excessive thickening of the heart walls.
What causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is caused by the mutation in one of a number of genes that encode for one of the sarcomere proteins.
What're the symptoms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? - Symptoms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy include shortness of breath, chest pain (angina), palpitations, dizziness and fainting attacks.
What's the treatment for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? - Treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is directed towards decreasing the left ventricular outflow tract gradient and to abort arrhythmias.
What's arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? - Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is a type of nonischemic cardiomyopathy that involves primarily the right ventricle.
What causes arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? - The cause of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia is largely unknown. Apoptosis appears to play a large role.
What's the treatment for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? - Pharmacologic treatment of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia involves arrhythmia suppression and prevention of thrombus formation.
What is restrictive cardiomyopathy? - Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is the least common cardiomyopathy. Restrictive cardiomyopathy can be caused by a number of diseases.
How restrictive cardiomyopathy is diagnosed? - The diagnosis of restrictive cardiomyopathy is usually based on a physical examination, echocardiography, and other tests as needed.
What's the treatment for restrictive cardiomyopathy? - There is no effective treatment for restrictive cardiomyopathy. Treatment of a causative disease may reduce or stop the damage to the heart.
How is cardiomyopathy treated? - Beta-blocker medicines, and calcium antagonist medicines are the mainstay of treatment for cardiomyopathy. Surgery may be indicated for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
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